We can’t beat Covid by channelling Churchill | Coronavirus outbreak


I, like so many others, am slack-jawed on the incompetence of this authorities’s response to Covid. Our dying fee is horrible and the continued blended messages from “go to work as you might be much less prone to be sacked in case you are within the workplace/don’t go to work” and “eat out to assist out/don’t eat out, definitely not after 10pm” have exhausted the general public and make compliance extra unlikely.

And now Boris Johnson insinuates that we’ve got a worse dying fee than many international locations in Europe as a result of we’re “freedom loving” (Follow new Covid restrictions, or risk a second lockdown, Johnson warns, 22 September). I’d be so grateful if he may cease this fake Churchillian tub-thumping with pernicious Brexit undertones, hinting that we’re higher than all of Europe as a result of we love freedom extra (the inference being that that’s the reason we’ve got voted to depart all these rule adherents behind). Let’s see how “freedom loving” the prime minister thinks all of us are when there are queues of seven,000 vehicles in Kent in January as Michael Gove now warns.

Just like the overwhelming majority of individuals, I’ll adhere to all the brand new rules, however each time I’m unable to do one thing I’d have usually completed I’ll suppose how unfair it’s when authorities aides can check their eyesight with journeys to Barnard Fort and never face a single penalty. I’d counsel that greater than being “freedom loving” the British public have a far greater regard for honest play.
Richard Teverson
Buckhurst Hill, Essex

Boris Johnson has once more acknowledged that we should always depend on our frequent sense to sluggish the rise in infections of Covid-19. However frequent sense is very subjective. Mine tells me that the federal government’s preliminary response in March ought to have exploited our pure benefit as an island nation by instantly closing the borders to non-UK residents, quarantining residents getting back from abroad, and starting testing locally. Maybe if frequent sense seemed extra like decisive motion, we wouldn’t now be in such a quandary over whether or not to guard public well being or the financial system. It appears more and more not possible to guard each.
Katherine Arnott
Peterborough

• Lockdown can work if managed correctly, however Johnson’s authorities hasn’t completed that. We have to be taught classes from Australia and New Zealand which have, on the entire, managed it effectively. The debacle in Melbourne proves that. The opposite Australian states nearly eradicated the virus by locking down laborious and implementing quarantine for incoming travellers. Victoria handed the job to non-public safety corporations who made a large number of it. Now, after a second lockdown, to which most Victorians have responded effectively, if bad-temperedly, it appears fairly sure that the entire nation will quickly be as Covid-free as is feasible with no vaccine. If hospital admissions and dying charges within the UK soar, and we’ve got to enter a second lockdown (Matt Hancock: Britain is at coronavirus tipping point, 20 September), it must be for all 4 nations and accompanied by strict bio-security measures for folks getting into the nation – repatriations and important travellers solely. Now we have the benefit of being an island, however have up to now didn’t make use of it.
Patrick Cosgrove
Bucknell, Shropshire

• Studying your letters page (22 September) one has to suppose the world has began to go barely mad. Readers extolling armed police at roadblocks asking to examine our papers earlier than permitting us to proceed (or not – with the specter of imprisonment if we don’t comply), and alarms on entrance gates to ward us from leaving our personal properties. Can’t we merely undertake the Swedish mannequin, do our greatest to guard essentially the most weak, and let life return to as near regular as it could possibly, with out on the similar time surrendering our rationality together with our liberty?
Dr David Boyd Haycock
Oxford